Rather like a habit one can always break, and yet.


Let's all take a moment to appreciate Nick Sullivan's cats.

Nick was one of my tutors in grad school. Now he's the Fashion Director at Esquire.

This is Mr. Parsley:





There is only one Robbie Williams.



Don't waste time with the idiots that think that they're heroes
They will betray you, stick with us weirdos.

Thing I Love: Notepads from Chateau Marmont.

Friday.

I've been waking up early every day this week with random food cravings. This morning, I was awake at 5:30 Googling Japanese curry. Yesterday I almost pulled the trigger on an $80 Hawaiian saimin noodle order (shipped overnight FedEx from the islands) before 6 a.m. Before that it was baked eggs with runny yolks. My memory doesn't stretch back past Wednesday.

Key learnings from this week:

· The best way to get over basically anything is to seek out your inner Beyonce as soon as humanly possible.

· For happiness and entertainment, go out every weeknight—with friends, to dinner, to work functions, on dates—but try to be home and in bed by 10 p.m., because it's winter and it's dark and cold outside.

· Adhere to the law of abundant bedding. My mother told me about a comforter that, in lieu of down, is filled with strands of silk. I bought a king size one, fold it in half and sleep under it. I still also have my fluffy down comforter in my bed. Lots of comforters = more comfort.

And that's all I have to say about that.

Skins / The End

Last night I downloaded Skins series 7 and watched it all the way through—Skins 1-4 were some of my favorite television shows of all time (I could never really get into series 5 and 6). Series 7 centered on three of my favorite Skins characters: the amazing Effy Stonem, the beautiful Cassie, and the brilliant James Cook. Here's the last minute or so from the very last episode ever of Skins. It's so rare that such a great, long-running TV show ends so perfectly.



He says: "You think you know death, but you don't, not until you've seen it, really seen it. It gets under your skin and lives inside you. You also think you know life, standing on the edge of things and watch it go by, but you're not living it, not really. You're just a tourist, a ghost. And then you see it, really see it. It gets under your skin and lives inside you, and there's no escape. There's nothing to be done. And you know what? It's good. It's a good thing. And that's all I've got to say about it."

Other times I feel like this.

Bear's First Christmas

Okay, I never thought about this until right this moment, but bears never get to see Christmas—because they're hibernating! John Lewis' Christmas commercial is about a bear and a hare who are friends—and the hare wants the bear to experience Christmas for the first time, so he buys him an alarm clock. It is the cutest.

The Dinner Scene / Before Midnight

These are my favorite lines in the film, when the older woman at the dinner party talks about her late husband. She says:
Well when I think of Elias, what I miss the most about him is the way he used to lie down next to me at night. Sometimes his arm would stretch along my chest and I couldn't move—I even held my breath—but I felt safe, complete. And I miss the way he was whistling, walking down the street. 
Everytime I do something, I think of what he would say—"It's cold today, wear a scarf." But lately, I've been forgetting little things. He's sort of fading, and I'm starting to forget him—and it's like losing him again. 
So sometimes I make myself remember every detail of his face—the exact color of his eyes, his lips, his teeth, the texture of his skin, his hair—it was all gone by the time he went. 
And sometimes, not always, but sometimes, I can actually see him. It's as if a cloud moves away and there he is—I could almost touch him—but then the real world rushes in and he vanishes again.  
For a while I did this every morning, when the sun was not too bright outside. The sun somehow makes him vanish. He appears and disappears like a sunrise, sunset—anything so ephemeral—just like our life.  
We appear and we disappear. And we are so important to some, but we are just passing through.
"Observe Everything. Always think for yourself. Never let other people make important decisions for you." — from Bad News by Edward St. Aubyn