Waiting for the bus at San Diego.

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In my life I have never lost my wallet.

This is how exhausted I am: This week, I have TWICE accidentally left my wallet on my desk at work. Including tonight. I hope no one steals it before tomorrow morning. Sigh.


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Obsessed: The Barbie Dance

From Interview magazine, 8/09

Jonkers:
> Whenever I hear The Police, I don't think of [makes siren sound] ne-nu-ne-nu-ne-nu, the police... I think of the band.
O'Brien:
> I always hated the band because I did think of ne-nu-ne-nu. I didn't like them.
Jonkers:
> Me neither.
Van Bennekom:
> It is a bad name.
Jonkers:
> Sting is a bad name too.
Van Bennekom:
> Horrendous.
Jonkers:
> It's not as bad as The Edge.
Van Bennekom:
> Bono is terrible, too. Boner? Bono?

It's Britney, Bitch.

maxine:
> have you ever seen kevin federline dance?
me:
> no
> have you seen him lately?
> i think we missed our chance.
> we'll never see him dance, now.

Work Wurk Werk

Not sure what's up with this week, but every day this week I've been heading to work at 7 a.m., home at 8 p.m., then worked at home until midnight before going to bed and trying to fall asleep, lying there quietly in the dark for a couple of hours before a short shut-eye and getting up and doing it all over again.

I might take the night off tonight and try to go to bed early. Tomorrow I'm up with the sun again to be in midtown for a photoshoot at 7 a.m.

I'm surprised I'm not too stressed. But maybe I'm a little numb.

Fashion as art

"I think fashion is an art form -- you might call it decorative or applied art as opposed to fine art, but what's the distinction? Because the same amount of artistic expression goes into clothes, a piece of pottery or a painting.... Fashion can tell you what people wore at a certain period just as pottery can tell you what their tea parties were like. I don't think the fact that these things were designed to be practical distinguishes them from fine art. You could say a painting is designed to go on a wall, but if it were made as a fresco, where it was part of the wall, would you say it was not art because it was practical?"
- Zandra Rhodes.

Often, I am too lazy to make more than one food per meal.

IMG_1428
One pot, one dish, one meal. Tonight it was mashed potatoes. Okay, not technically a traditional main-course, but doesn't it deserve to be? I always think of "Mermaids" wherein Cher's character only makes hors d'oeuvres for dinner -- and rightly so, as hors d'oeuvres are the most interesting part of a meal. Anyway, everybody loves mashed potatoes. I got some nice organic yukon gold potatoes this weekend, not too big, a little smaller than the size of my fist each. I threw a few into a pot with salted boiling water, then drained them and mashed em up with a slug of butter, some sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Late dinner, it's nearly 9 p.m., and I didn't want to eat a big meal because I'm up with the sun tomorrow for the first day of school -- classes start at 8 a.m.! I've printed all my syllabuses on hot pink paper. It's not a gimmick, I swear. It's just that I've had this ream of hot pink paper in my apartment for years and this is the best way to get rid of it.
Things I like that as a mature 30-something year old I am no longer embarrassed about liking: Fresca, Hugh Grant movies and soundtracks from Hugh Grant movies.

OMD - Call My Name

Oh, the 90s.



"I've seen a new sensation, I heard you call in pain. But running round in circles won't make it right again. The telephone keeps ringing, your head is in the sand. The future is unfolding but its not what you had planned."

My mother won't be happy when she sees this

This morning, she suggested I join a badminton club.
Instead, I made gluten-free brownies and put peanut butter on top:

IMG_1397

The way it used to be

March 2004

Biolage Matrix Age Rejuvenating Intensive Masque



I've used Terax Crema conditioner for more than 10 years -- since sophomore year of college, actually. I love it, it's amazing, it keeps my waist-length hair knot-free, sleek and shiny. It's practically a godsend.

But, man am I sick of shelling out $50 for it every couple of months.

So, in a newfound effort to redirect more funds towards my credit card bill (and away from my hair follicles), I've been on a hunt for a really great conditioner that won't break the bank. Or, at least, costs significantly less than Terax's Crema.

Every day this week I've been using Biolage by Matrix's Age Rejuvenating Intensive Masque as my conditioner. It's pretty damn good -- there's no slick conditioner texture or residue. As soon as you scoop it out of the jar, you can tell it's a concentrated masque formula that isn't just a quick-fix silicone follicle coat.

It leaves my hair super-sleek, static- and frizz-free, knot-free, and not at all weighed down. The thing I've loved about Terax all this time is that it makes my hair super-soft -- a friend of mine once remarked after using it that Terax Crema actually changes the texture of your hair -- and I think that the results that this Matrix masque gives is just as good -- if not better. Some women I know have complained that Crema has left their hair so soft that it becomes difficult to style. The Matrix masque seems to yield a more manageable result.

You can get it for about $20 online, but if you order from UK distributors, it's only about $12 -- that's nearly half price!

Next week I'm going to be giving another conditioner/mask a spin. I won't stop until I find something perfect and affordable.

Orzo and harissa tomato weekend soup

When I lived in a much bigger apartment with a much bigger kitchen in Queens, I used to cook... a lot. I made all my own bread from scratch, fried chicken, slow-cooked stews, you name it. I even bought a hand-crank pasta maker and used it. Ever since I moved into my Manhattan apartment four years ago, I've done way less in the kitchen -- my vast collection of cookbooks (Nigel Slater is my favorite) are languishing on my bookshelf -- mostly because my kitchen is tiny (tiny cooking range, tiny oven, tiny countertop) and also because I don't have an extractor fan. Something about this building means you can't extract cooking fumes anywhere, I didn't understand what the explanation was, I just know I was denied. Lately, I've been trying to make more simple things at home -- simple, one- or two-pot meals for one person that are less expensive and healthier than takeout.

Now, I'm no chef. Let me emphasize that. I'm no chef. But I do love to eat. I love the flavor and texture of food, I love eating with friends, I love eating alone. And, to honest, left to my own devices (and probably if I didn't work in media), I'd probably eat myself silly (to death, even!). So the point is I like simple food that has strong flavors and feel-good textures.

Lately I've been obsessed with Orzo -- it's like rice, but not! And I opened a jar of Alili Harissa last week and haven't stopped using it since. So this weekend, instead of the orzo-and-vegetables I ate last weekend (healthier), I cooked half a packet of Orzo, mixed it with a couple of pats of butter, one can of Campbell's Healthy-Choice tomato soup, and a bit of the pasta cooking water. I seasoned it with a half tablespoon of harissa, two shakes of nutmeg and some crushed oregano leaves. And it's a cheap and cheerful lunch for one!

... and there's a pan of gluten-free brownies cooling in the kitchen for dessert...

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Second impressions

I'm beginning to wonder what sort of impression people have of me. In the past month two friends have remarked that I don't seem to do anything. "What have you done this year?" one asked at dinner one night. And today, another friend said to me, "You always say you have all this stuff to do but you just watch TV."

I find this strange. And I never know how to answer them.

I mean, not just because I feel really really really busy and don't have an awful lot of free time, but because, right now I'm basically working three jobs (the paper, teaching, and freelancing) plus working on a book proposal. I've never thought I come off as a very laid-back person, in general, so it really seems strange that two people who know me fairly well think I don't do anything at all, besides, I guess, watch tv.

Hm. Sometimes I wish I could see myself from the third-person point of view.

Billy gave me "Bugs in a Blanket." It is the best book, ever.

"Little Fat Bug has baked some delicious blanket-dust cakes for his party. He's hung up some pretty lanterns and plugged in a record player to play nice loud music. Everyone knows that little bugs love to dance and hop about." - from "Bugs in a Blanket" by Beatrice Alemagna


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Today's Haute List

Caulfield Prep, D*Coded, Lather Spa, Carol Alt and more!

Yummy at Old Navy

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Me:
> She's a model, it's her job to be thin.
L:
> Wish that was my job.
Me:
> That could never be my job. I'd sooo get fired.

The End of Gaydar

My fortune

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I've never made Orzo before.

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The Charles

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"You know of Meepers, right??"

"MY CAT MEEPERS !!! Everyone knows Meepers!!" - Marianne



I'm dying. Meepers is gorgeous. And has a hilarious expression on her face.

Caption: Meepers
Photo by: Meepers' Mom

Today's Haute List

Page Six: "Title Fight KO"

Heartless

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The Kanye West setlist

Sorry, photos prohibited during the show....
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Here I am: Cipriani Wall Street, Casio G Shock Kanye West

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Cheapest Blackberry Ever!

Charla Krupp changed the name of her book!

I'm so pleased that Krupp decided to come up with a new name for her book that's slightly more original! Big Yay and thank you so much for everyone who supported me. It may not have seemed like a big deal, but it was a big deal to me, so I really appreciate all the re-Tweets, the news items, and my amazing co-workers for your encouragement and support.

From WWD.com:
"THE NAME HAS BEEN CHANGED…: The New York Post’s Page Six column on Sunday called out author Charla Krupp for the title of her forthcoming book, “How Not to Look Fat Ever Again,” noting its similarity to Post reporter Danica Lo’s 2006 book, “How Not to Look Fat.” In the item, Lo told Page Six, “For a best-sellling author to try and steamroll a first-time author and steal my title is truly shameful.”

Now Lo may be happy to hear Krupp has responded by changing her title to “How to Never Look Fat Again.” “Even though I was not legally required to change the title of my forthcoming book, I do not want the title to cloud the release of the book with any negativity,” said Krupp, who is also a contributor to People StyleWatch. “In any case, thank you to Danica — I now have an even better title.” The book will be published in March by Springboard Press, an imprint of Grand Central Publishing."

— A.W.

Meepers

This is what I did today: Bryant Park Hotel at 9 a.m. for Blackberry info session; editorial meeting at 10; new blog platform training at 11; filed for Wednesday's paper until 2; filed Thursday's column until 4:30; editorial meeting downtown at 5; walked home, ate a popsicle and some random food from my fridge at 6:30; worked on fashion media communications syllabus until 10; worked on fashion writing syllabus until now, 12:15 a.m. Still not finished. Who knew putting together reading lists was such hard work? It's kind of cool, though, because it gives me an excuse to go through all my saved magazines and old fashion books, which, otherwise, I'd never have time to look at. Going to bed now, hopefully will be able to sleep. Then, hopefully will be able to wake up early to do some more work on the fashion writing syllabus before my photoshoot call time at 9 a.m. I burned the back of my right hand with my curling iron last week. I hope it doesn't scar. Gosh, isn't fashion glamorous. Ha ha ha.

You're a New Yorker if...

This was almost the show.

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"How has old age changed you? What's the main thing that it's altered in your life?"

Jack Gilbert:
"Romance. You can still play at it, but when you get into your sixties -- even your fifties -- romance seems a little bit silly. After people get to be thirty, generally speaking, they don't want excitement. The glands might flutter up every once in a while, but basically I think people want to be comfortable. To be sexual takes a lot of work. One of the difficulties, I think, is that when you look in the mirror it's hard to think of yourself as romantic."
From "The Paris Review Interviews" vol. 1

"Somebody Told Me About Carla Bruni"



Tonight I watched the 'Fine Cut' (not final) screener of documentary "Somebody Told Me About Carla Bruni," which airs in September during New York Fashion Week on the Sundance Channel. It's fantastic and I'd highly recommend watching or DVR-ing it when it's on in a few weeks. I didn't know much about Ms. Bruni -- besides seeing her in videos, fashion documentaries (like her particularly memorable turn in 'Unzipped') and reading about her foray into First Lady-life as Madame Sarkozy. In the film she is utterly charming. The director also interviews Ms. Bruni's mother, sister and John Galliano, who designs all the Dior clothes Ms. Bruni wears on her diplomatic excursions. It was especially nice to see the inside of the Elysee Palace and sit with Ms. Bruni while she played the guitar.

Outpouring of support



I really do appreciate all the support my friends have given me over the last few days. I know that, to some people, this all seems pointless -- "You're just giving her free press," people have scolded me. Okay, I know. But it's not my goal to stop her from selling books, it's not my goal prevent her from being a bestseller -- Charla Krupp could sell a bazillion books, she probably will, she's a very good writer and has a lot of good ideas. How many books she sells -- that's none of my business. All I want is that someone who I consider a colleague in the same New York City-based women's lifestyle journalism and media industry (it's actually a really small world) to have the decency and respect to not copy my book title. That. Is. All.



Here's the thing that really gets me. After I posted my first entry about "How Not to Look Fat" Jr.'s impending arrival, Charla Krupp sent me a Facebook message. In it, she wrote, and I quote:

"By the way, did you see the new book, How Not to Act Old? I think I know how you feel. Really I do."

Oh really? So, someone co-opted the title of Charla Krupp's first book, she got upset, so she turns around and does it to another author.

Thanks a lot.

The saying isn't "Do unto others as others have done unto you," you know?

Page Six: "Shame on Charla Krupp."

Thanks for the support!

I've gotten a lot of great support since posting about Charla Krupp lifting my book title for her own, upcoming book. My post was picked up on Racked.com:



And it was Re-tweeted by Brokelyn.com (a really cool/smart/funny site about getting by on the cheap -- coincidentally, it's headed up by Faye Penn, my former editor at the Post who helped me come up with the title "How Not to Look Fat") and Manhattan Users' Guide.



Thanks for everyone's supportive emails and messages on Facebook!

Over the past 24 hours I've been talking to the powers that be and I'm hoping this problem can be quickly resolved. I'll post updates here.
"Observe Everything. Always think for yourself. Never let other people make important decisions for you." — from Bad News by Edward St. Aubyn