Rachel Bilson's dog is named Thurman Murman? And other Sunday things.

I read that in Page Six Magazine just now. The novel writing isn't going very well, in fact, in the past 24 hours I've started, then restarted, then restarted again. I have about 2300 words right now, in its latest incarnatiion. Nick emailed me this morning to commiserate, but he's already written twice as many words.

There are so many things and ideas I hear and write down and want to incorporate into the book, but I really am forcing myself to edit and focus. I keep telling my friends that my goal in life is to retire to a small waterside cottage with a garden in Oxford and write bestselling pocket books -- eyes on the prize, you know. But I think at the rate this is going, that will be a long time off.

Good news is that for the first time in years, I think I have new year's plans in place that don't make me want to crawl under the covers and die. Actually, they are quite grown-up and civilized and may or may not involve wildlife and animals in a Disney-like setting. More TK, it's all very up in the air right now.

Oh, when I was in high school I was on the policy debate team freshman year. My debate partner and I did pretty well and even went to quarterfinals at State, then I went to debate institute that summer and in the fall, the captain of the debate team kicked me off because he told me I had to judge the Newburgh Free Academy tournament and I couldn't because I had plans with my family that weekend. He shouted at me a lot in the sixth floor hallway and then kicked me off the team. Now he's the CEO of this email-handheld company, Peek, and they've just launched their handheld e-mail only device. Sounds like a cool idea, but I'm seeing limited growth for this product unless it expands to incorporate international roaming, web-browsing, and social networking aspect. Nothing is "just email" anymore -- even occasional users need to open links from emails. Anyway, good for him, the CEO, and so much for schadenfreude.
"Observe Everything. Always think for yourself. Never let other people make important decisions for you." — from Bad News by Edward St. Aubyn